Hawker Typhoon DN365

Queenside Muir, Lochwinnoch

 
     
 
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Aircraft Type Photo

 

BELOW: A Hawker Typhoon Mk IB 

 

hawker typhoon mk 1b

 

Photo: RAF (pre-1957). Expired Crown Copyright.

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type and Background

 

RAF Hawker Typhoon / DN365

 

Aircraft Type Nickname: "The Tiffy."

 

A military single-seat fighter/bomber flown by the Royal Air Force. Built by the Gloster Aircraft Company, the Typhoon was equipped latterly with a Napier Sabre liquid cooled power plant and could attain a maximum speed of 405 mph at 18,000 ft (650 km/h at 5,485 m). In addition to the RAF, it was used by the RCAF and the RNZAF.

 

Cross-utilisation of aircraft amongst different branches is not uncommon. The military is among various other industries that use the same machinery towards a different end. Several manufacturers use the same technology to produce vacuum cleaners across different brands for example.

 

Unfortunately, the Typhoon suffered from a number of design defects, which may have led to the loss of certain aircraft.

 

From certain angles, the Typhoon bore some resemblance to a Focke-Wolfe Fw 190 aircraft. To avoid friendly-fire incidents, the Typhoon had black and white stripes painted under the wings.

 


 

BELOW: A Hawker Typhoon ground attack fighter

 

hawker typhoon ground attack fighter

 

Photo: Source unknown

 


 

BELOW: A Hawker Typhoon on display at RAF Museum London (formerly, RAF Hendon)

 

hawker typhoon on display at raf hendon

 

Photo: 2006 (Licensing: Released by the author as public domain)

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Accident Details                      

 

This particular Hawker Typhoon (DN365) crashed into Queenside Hill killing the pilot. Little is known about the background to this accident, except that the aircraft was on a training exercise when the pilot encountered low cloud and poor visibility. The aircraft had begun its flight from RAF Drem in East Lothian and was heading for RAF Ayr (Heathfield) at the time of the accident.

 

Quintin McKellar Sr. (now deceased) who farmed the land at Queenside Muir, witnessed the aftermath of this accident. In the foggy conditions then enveloping the hills, he could hear the aircraft approaching from Calder Glen (E of his present location). Moments later, he heard the sound of the crash on Queenside Muir.

 

Together with a gamekeeper from Lord Howard of Glossop's Muirshiel Estate, Mr. McKellar made his way through the mist and rain to the scene of the accident. However, the pilot had already been killed by the impact.

 

According to Mr. McKellar Sr., the aircraft involved in this accident was a Hawker Hurricane. However, this is disputed by Typhoon International, who reckon it was a Hawker Typhoon.

 

In any event, the wreckage was cleared from the site by an RAF recovery team, andexcept for part of the propellervery little of the aircraft now remains onsite. (See Box at the top right of this page for GPS references for the propeller.)

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Pilot Casualty

 

The pilot who died in this incident was:

  • F/O Steven A. N. Gould

 

 

 

 

Crash Site Photos

 

 

Approach Route Photos

 

 

BELOW: En route to the Typhoon crash site using one of the old barium mine tracks.

 

(Muirshiel Barium Sulphate mines closed in 1969 after operating for about 200 years; the last operator being Rio Tinto Zinc. The track and bridges leading to the various mines have since fallen into disrepair, but the safer parts are still used by quad bikes and larger 4x4 vehicles.)

 

En route to the Typhoon crash site using the Muirshiel Mine track.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A closer view of one of the derilict bridges.

 

A closer view of one of the derilict bridges.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Site of Anson L7949 (red arrow) from the summit of Queenside Hill.

 

The wreckage of Anson L7949 is located close to Cockmalain, Lairdside Hill, near Lochwinnoch.

 

Site of Anson L7949 from the summit of Queenside Hill.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Site of Seafire PR432 (red arrow) from the summit of Queenside Hill.

 

The remaining wreckage fragments from Seafire PR432 is located at Hill of Stake on the North Ayrshire / Renfrewshire boundary.

 

Site of Seafire PR432 (red arrow) from the summit of Queenside Hill.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 


 

 

 

Remaining Wreckage from Hawker Typhoon DN365

 

 

BELOW: Single surviving propellor blade, hub and reduction gear.

 

Single surviving propellor blade, hub and reduction gear.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A closer view of the hub / reduction gear casing.

 

A closer view of the hub / reduction gear casing.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Side view of hub / reduction gear casing showing part of the gears.

 

Side view of hub / reduction gear casing showing part of the gears.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Reduction gear housing damage.

 

Reduction gear housing damage.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The 4 helical gears (only 2 still in place) and the airscrew shaft gear.

 

The 4 helical gears (only 2  still in place) and the airscrew shaft gear.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Location of missing helical gear.

 

Location of missing helical gear.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: 3rd helical gear back in place.

 

3rd helical gear back in place.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Detached helical gear.

 

One of the gear sets.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Reduction gears and propeller hub.

 

Reduction gears and propeller hub.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Another view of the reduction gears.

 

Another view of the reduction gears.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Gears and hub shown in relation to the National Grid pylons across the moor (yellow arrows).

 

Gears and hub shown in relation to the National Grid pylons across the moor (yellow arrows).

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Propeller hub assembly shown in relation to one of the Muirshiel Mine tracks (part of which is enclosed within yellow ellipsis).

 

Propeller hub assembly shown in relation to the main Muirshiel Mine track (yellow arrows).

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 

 

MORE PHOTOS BELOW

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

BELOW: The single remaining corroded and flaking propeller blade.

 

The single remaining propeller blade.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A close-up of the flaking propeller blade tip.

 

A close-up of the flaking propeller tip.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: This view shows the amount of curvature on the blade.

 

This view shows the amount of curvature on the blade.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: These photos show how the effect of exposure to the elements on a windswept moor has affected the blade since the Typhoon crashed here in 1943.

 

These photos show how the effect of exposure to the elements has affected the blade since the Typhoon crashed here in 1943.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: This view shows the propeller blade and hub in relation to the towns in the background.

 

Bridge of Weir and Kilmacolm is near the top left of the photo; and (from left to right) part of Glasgow, Paisley and Johnstone lie straight ahead, just below the horizon.

 

This view shows the propeller blade and hub in relation to the towns in the background.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Contrails from a jet aircraft overflying the crash area.

 

Contrails from a jet aircraft overflying the crash area.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (foreground): This is reported to be a panel from an unrelated Hurricane crash site which was brought here with the intention of using it to remove the typhoon wreckage. Apparently, it was abandoned here when it started to rain.

 

This has probably caused the confusion about this being a Hurricane wreck.

 

This is reported to be a panel from an unrelated Hurricane crash site which was brought here.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A closer view of the abandoned Hurricane panel.

 

A closer view of the abandoned Hurricane panel.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The panel shown in relation to the moor sloping down toward Calder Glen.

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 


 

 

More Route Photos

 

 

BELOW: Back on the barium mine road.

 

Until 1969, this and other related dirt tracks once carried heavy tipper trucks operating a daily shuttle service from the barium mines to the dressing plant in Kingston, Glasgow (to where it was moved in later years).

 

Until 1969, this and other related dirt tracks once carried a steady stream of heavy trucks operating a daily shuttle service from the barium mines to the dressing plant in Glasgow.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Slightly further down the track.

 

The principal mine road continues downhill for about 8km (5 miles), exiting eventually at the village of Lochwinnoch in Renfrewshire.

 

Slightly further down the track.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: One of several streams seen along the way.

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

Earlier Photo

 

 

BELOW: The impact point.

 

The impact point.

 

Photo: © Alan Leishman

 

 

 


 

 

 

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Crash Date / Site

 

 

Page last updated: 18 Apr 2015

 



 

Accident Date: 24 Jan 1943

 

Accident Site:

Queenside Muir (400m)

 

Region: Renfrewshire

 

Nearest town or village:

Lochwinnoch

 

Nearest large towns:

Kilbirnie (SW) or Johnstone (NW)

 

OS Grid Ref. 63 / NS 297 642

 

GPS Ref. NS 29553 64276 (propeller)

 

Present Condition: Only the remains of the propeller and reduction gear remain onsite.

 

These few remaining parts can be found on Queenside Hill (part of Queenside Muir), not far from Queenside Loch. Queenside Hill is about 6 miles (c.10 km) NW of Lochwinnoch by the Muirshiel Mine road, or about 6 miles NE of Largs via Hill of Stake.

 

 

 

Aircraft Details

 

Registration or Serial: DN365

 

Operator:  RAF

 

Operating Base: RAF Drem (Gullane / West Fenton (RAF 13 Grp. Fighter Ops.) RN HMS Nighthawk

 

Base Location: Drem, N. Berwick, E. Lothian, Scotland

 

Current Airport Status: Closed 1946; See nearby support airfield at East Fortune; now, National Museum of Flight

 

 

 

Related Links

 

RAF and Related Links

RAF Drem

The Wartime Memories Project - RAF Drem

 

Other Link

Hawker Typhoon at Wikipedia

 

 

Hill Walking Links

 

 

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WalkingScotland (The official Walking site of Scotland's national tourism organisation)

Walking Scotland's Mountains

 


 

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