Vickers Viking G-AIVE

Irish Law, Largs, North Ayrshire

 
     
 
lefttop
 

 

 

Advertisements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type Photo

 

BELOW: BEA Vickers Viking 1B G-AHPO "Venturer" at Manchester Airport. This aircraft was very similar to the one featured below.

 

a vickers vicking at Manchester

 

Photo: 1952 'RuthAS'.  Released by the author to the public domain under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

 


 

 

 NASA Aircraft—-Management Information Systems

 US Department of Energy—-Software and Analytical Tools

 Library Services—-Bibliographic Asset Management Software

 MAPCON Asset Management Software—-EAM Software Services

 Graduate Programs—-Bachelors in Asset Management Software

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type and Background

 

BEA Vickers 610 VC.1 Viking 1B / G-AIVE "Vestal"

 


 

Aircraft Type Acronym: VC = Vickers Commercial.

(All BEA Vickers Viking aircraft had names beginning with the letter 'V'. The one featured on these pages was named "Vestal". Others included "Venturer" and "Vagrant").


A civilian aircraft operated by British European Airways (later incorporated within British Airways)

The design of the Vickers Viking was derived from Vickers Wellington bomber. The Viking was a twin-engine medium-range aircraft, capable of accommodating 21-24 passengers, depending on the variant. Later variants could accommodate more passengers.

The Viking 1B variant, which carried 24 passengers, was equipped with two Bristol Hercules 634 14-cylinder radial air-cooled piston engines. The aircraft's maximum speed was about 423km/h (263mph).

 


 

BELOW: Another similar BEA Vickers Viking Mk I. At the time this photo was taken, this preserved aircraft was being restored for static display at Brooklands Museum.

 

another similar BEA vickers viking being restored at Brooklands Museum

 

Photo: © 2008 Shaun Moroney

 


 

BELOW: External view of cockpit of above Viking.

 

outside view of cockpit of viking shown above

 

Photo: © 2008 Shaun Moroney

 

(For more photos of this aircraft at Brooklands Museum, see under Preserved Aircraft on this website.)

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Accident Details                      

 

BEA Vickers Viking G-AIVE, had started its journey from London Northolt airport (c.6 miles from the present Heathrow) and was about to make its final approach to its destination airport—the former Glasgow Renfrew aerodrome.

 

Apparently, however, the pilot experienced some difficulty in locating the outer landing beacon. This situation was exacerbated by severe turbulence together with low cloud and mist over the hills.

 

As he had been unable to locate the outer marker, the pilot began his procedure turn too far west of this beacon resulting in him flying over high terrain. Unfortunately, during this manoeuvre, the aircraft  struck the hillside at Irish Law.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Crew and Passengers

 

Fortunately, the 16 passengers and 4 crew escaped serious injury, and managed to make their way clear of the stricken aircraft just before it was engulfed in flames.

 

Although shocked and badly shaken, the pilot—Captain John Ramsden of Glasgow—and one of the passengers managed to make their way westward across the rugged moorland in the darkness.

 

Three hours later, they arrived at Largs, where they raised the alarm. Meanwhile, some of the other survivors, led by First Officer D. P. Clifton, had managed to reach Flatt Farm (now disused) in Largs.

 

After spending a night on the moors, other members of the group sought help in the opposite direction. From Irish Law, and with the aid of a miniature compass, they made their way eastward to Ladyland House near Kilbirnie, where they sought assistance for their plight.

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Site Photos

 

BELOW: Approaching Irish Law from the west.

 

The Viking wreckage lies near the northern base of Irish Law.

 

approaching Irish Law

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 



 

BELOW: Descending the northern slopes of Irish Law to the Vickers Viking crash site on the moorland below.

 

The remains of the wings and engines lie closest to the camera. The tail cone lies on its own, further away from the camera.

 

descending irish law to the viking crash site on the northern lower slopes

 

Photo: © 2013 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: The main body of wreckage from BEA Viking G-AIVE.

 

Engines, nacelles and wing roots are shown here. Fire destroyed the fuselage and main sections of the wings—although all the passengers and crew had already escaped safely.

 

the main body of viking wreckage 

 

Photo: © 2013 Neil Daniel

 



 

BELOW: Propeller gearbox and blade stubs from one of the aircraft's two engines.

 

This item lies a short distance away from, and NW of, the main wreckage field.

 

propeller gearbox and blade stubs

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Part of the bevel gear drive from the Viking's propeller assembly.

 

part of propeller bevel gear drive

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Close-up of propeller reduction gear and outer casing.

 

close-up of propeller reduction gear and outer casing

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Approaching the main wreckage.

 

approaching the main wreckage

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (Main wreckage): Remains of wings and engine nacelles.

 

remains of wings and engine nacelles

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The starboard main landing gear tyre, retracted within the nacelle.

 

one of the main landing gear tyres housed within the nacelle

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: View inside the engine nacelle.

 

view inside engine nacelle

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The remains of one of the wings, showing internal lattice framework.

 

This design was based on Barnes Wallis' geodetic structure which was used to great effect in the Vickers Wellington bombers of World War II.

 

remains of wing, showing internal lattice construction

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The starboard Bristol Hercules 634 14-cylinder radial air-cooled piston engine.

 

This engine is still attached to the engine bearers and nacelle.

 

starboard engine and nacelle

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Side view of starboard engine showing engine bearers more clearly.

 

side view of starboard engine

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Side view of starboard engine showing off-set cylinders on the radial piston engine.

 

The Bristol Hercules was a 14-cylinder engine (7-cylinders on each side of the off-set).

 

side view of starboard engine showing cylinders

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The port Bristol Hercules engine.

 

one of the two engines

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Another view of the detached port engine.

 

closer view of detached engine

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A cylinder head from the above engine.

 

a cylinder head from the detached engine

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (Tailplane wreckage): Part of the Viking's tail cone. This item lies in boggy ground a short distance away from the main wreckage, and to the NE of it.

 

The tail landing gear wheel fork is just visible protruding from the gap.

 

(The Vickers Viking was a 'tail-dragger', making forward visibility on the ground rather difficult. This problem was resolved with the coming of the Vickers Viscount, which had a conventional tricycle undercarriage.)

 

part of the viking's tail cone

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Side view of the tail cone.

 

side view of tail cone

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A section of wing from the tailplane.

 

section of wing from the tailplane

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Unidentified wreckage part.

 

unidentified wreckage part

 

Photo: © 2013 Gary Nelson

 

 

MORE PHOTOS BELOW

 

 


 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Pre 2008 Photos

 

BELOW: A photo taken in October 2007 of Vickers Viking G-AIVE lying on the hillside at Irish Law. In this photo, remains of the engine, nacelle and landing gear tyre can be seen. Other remains lie scattered across this area.

 

The aircraft remains have now lain on this hillside for over 60 years.

 

overview of remaining vickers viking wreckage at 2007

 

Photo: © 2007 Danny J Parkinson

 


 

BELOW: Viking nacelle, engine, and part of the wing structure.

 

viking nacelle, engine, and part of wing

 

Photo: © 2007 Stevie

 


 

BELOW: Overall view of the Vickers Viking wreck as it appeared in April 2007.

 

overview of viking wreck as it appeared at april 2007

 

Photo © 2007 Steve White

 


 

BELOW: A similar view of the above taken in 2006.

 

a similar photo of the above wreckage taken in 2006

 

Photo © 2006 Giovanni Metra

 


 

BELOW: Detached tail cone wreckage from the Viking. The mainframe can be seen in the background.

 

detached wreckage from the viking. the mainframe can be seen in the background

 

Photo © 2007 Steve White

 


 

BELOW: Close-up view of detached wreckage, showing some names and dates of site visitors.

 

Among the inscriptions is one by a group from the ATC (Air Training Corps) who were regular visitors to these crash sites.

 

Another inscription near the top right hand corner is dated 1947. However, the aircraft did not crash until April 1948!

 

close-up of above detached section

 

Photo © 2006 Steve White

 


 

BELOW: Close-up of landing gear tyre. The rubber tread is still quite evident, even after 60 years of exposure to the elements on the Largs hills.

 

a tyre from one of the main landing gears

 

Photo © 2006 Steve White

 


 

BELOW: Close-up of remains of an engine section from the Vickers Viking.

 

close-up of remains of an engine section from vickers viking

 

Photo © 2006 Giovanni Metra

 


 

BELOW: Remains of one of the two Bristol Hercules engines from Viking G-AIVE.

 

remains of one of the two engines from the viking

 

Photo © 2006 Giovanni Metra

 


 

BELOW: Close-up section of engine shown above.

 

close-up of engine section

 

Photo © 2006 Giovanni Metra

 


 

BELOW: Section of Viking's wing, showing internal geodetic (lattice) construction. The same geodetic structure was used  in the Vickers Wellington bomber, on which the Viking design was based.

 

part of wing showing geodetic structure

 

Photo © 2006 Giovanni Metra

 

 


 

 

Older Photos

 

 

BELOW: Close-up of right engine housing or nacelle.

 

As can be seen, this (and other) aircraft wrecks have been adorned with various inscriptions by the many visitors to these sites.

 

close-up of engine nacelle. photo taken in 1989

 

Photo: 1989 Gordon Lyons

 


 

BELOW: Engine housing (nacelle) and section of main wing.

 

nacelle and section of main wing

 

Photo: 1989 Gordon Lyons

 

 

 

 

FORWARD TO PAGE 2

(Largs and Millport Weekly News feature)

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 Search Website

Air Crash Sites-Scotland

Custom Search

 

Search here for: aircraft types | crash sites | crew names | hills or mountains

Please enter desired aircraft type, crew name, or location in search box.
 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

TOP OF PAGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Date / Site

 

 

Accident Date: 21 Apr 1948

 

Accident Site:

Irish Law (484m)

 

Lying at the N base of Irish Law on the North Ayrshire hills, c.4 miles (c.6 km) E of Largs.

 

Region: North Ayrshire (Clyde-Muirshiel Regional Park)

 

Nearest town or village:

Largs

 

Nearest large towns:

Largs (W) or Kilbirnie (E)

 

OS Grid Ref: 63 / NS 260593

 

GPS Ref. NS 26140 59225 (empennage or tail assy.)

 

GPS Ref: NS 26069 59195(wings & nacelles)

 

Present Condition: Substantial parts of the fuselage, wings, engines, nacelles and landing gear can be found onsite.

 


 

 

Air crashes in this vicinity:

 

 

South side of A760:

 

1) RN Fairey Firefly DT977, Blaeloch Hill.

(Now within the grounds of a publicly-accessible wind farm at Kelburn Estate.)
Some parts, including engine, remain at the crash site, and are described on information boards by the wind farm operators (RES). RES have created a visitor's car park off the A760, and walking routes for the area. [Map and route details here.]

 

 

North side of A760:

 

2) RAF de Havilland Devon VP969, Slaty Law / Box Law.

Wings, engines and under-carriage, etc., remain at the site.

 

3) RAF Vickers Wellington R1164, Box Law.

Fragmented wreckage only remains at the crash site.

 

4) BEA Vickers Viking G-AIVE, Irish Law.

(The aircraft on this page.)

Wings, engines and under-carriage, etc., remain at the site.

 

5) RN Supermarine Sea Spitfire ('Seafire'). Hill of Stake.

All remaining wreckage now removed from the site.

 

6) Northern Scottish Airways Spartan Cruiser, Hill of Stake.

Remaining fuselage shell was recovered from the site in 1973. Now at the National Museum of Flight, East Fortune.

 

7) RAF Bristol Beaufort L9817, Knockside Hills, S of Irish Law.
Wreckage removed by RAF recovery team. Fragments only remain at the crash site.

 

8) Starways Douglas C-47B Dakota G-AMRB, Greenside Hill, SE of Irish Law.

Fragments only remain at the crash site.

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Details

 

 

Registration or Serial: G-AIVE

 

Construction No. and Name: 218 / "Vestal"

 

Operator:  British European Airways (BEA)

 

Operating Base: London (Northolt) Airport

 

Base Location: Ruislip, Middlesex

 

Current Airport Status: Operational Military Airport; VIP Transport Service.

 

Current Airport Name: RAF Northolt

 

 

 

 

Hill Walking Links

 

 

(Hillwalking and Mountaineering)

WalkingScotland (The official Walking site of Scotland's national tourism organisation)

Walking Scotland's Mountains

 

 


 

Emergency Services Link

Register for Text 999 Emergency Service

If you cannot make voice calls, you can now contact the 999 emergency services by SMS text from your mobile phone.

 

 

 

 

Essential Gear

 

 

Beacon GPS Guide Maps

 

Essential Equipment - Three Seasons.

 

Trespass - Outdoor Clothing and Equipment

 

Walking Boots Advice

 

 

 

 

 
righttop